The Advisory Program -
How do I do this?
1. Trust yourself.

- You are experts at working with this age group.
- Use your own experiences as an educator to guide you as an advisor.
- There are many different ways to reach students, and you know what works for you.
- Though we all have the same goal of connecting with students, each advisory does not have to operate exactly the same way.

2. Set a positive tone.

- Enthusiasm is critical.
- Call your advisees by name.
- Sit in a circle when possible or have students sit in a small section of your advisory space to create an inclusive environment.
- If you demonstrate that an activity is fun and worthwhile, they will believe it is fun and worthwhile.
- Greet the students when they enter your advisory space.
- Let the students know what you will be doing and be clear about expectations.
- Have fun!

3. Remember that it takes time to develop a relationship.

- If your advisees do not open up right away, it is NORMAL. It does not mean that they do not like you or the program.
- Do not expect the students to take the lead immediately. Be willing to initiate conversations, and share your thoughts and ideas.
- Invite the students to participate in the conversation and/or ask them their opinion directly, “What do you think about __?”


Leading Group Discussions –

Tips and Ideas

Below are some tips and ideas about how to get discussions going and how to lead them. Using an icebreaker to start is a good way to get them talking. Then, you can transition into more difficult or complex topics.

Tips to Keep in Mind when Leading Group Discussions

1. Have questions prepared before hand. Use the topics and questions provided in your monthly advisory newsletter for each session.

2. Pause after asking each question (“wait time”). Do not be afraid to let it be silent for 15-30 seconds before someone answers.

3. Listen well – Make sure you are listening and responding to each student’s comment. A simple, “I see what you mean” or “thank you” can make someone feel like they have done a good job.

4. Share yourself – Be willing to share your own ideas or opinions.

5. Pay attention to how each person in the group is listening and responding to the discussion. Notice if someone is not participating or is looking uncomfortable and address their issues in a tactful way. (Example – re-direct the discussion or change the topic).

6. Invite people to participate – Don’t be afraid to call on a student and ask for his/her opinion or ideas.


What should I do if I am concerned about an advisee or about something A student shares during our advisory time together?

If you are concerned about one of your advisees experiencing any type of social, emotional or mental health issues, please contact his or her guidance counselor. The counselors have many resources to support students.

Guidance Counselor Assignments for the 2012-2013 School Year


Seniors
Juniors
Sophomores
Freshmen

2013
2014
2015
2016
COUNSELOR




Marissa Coughlin


A-CAM


A - COH


A-CL
A-CHIE
Rosanne Sannicandro


CAN-DI


COL-GILB


CO-GA
CHIN-FO
Cindy Hurley


DO-HI


GILL-JOHN


GE-JAE
FR-HO
John Steere


HO-LEI


JON-MARR


JAM-L


HU-LIS
Meg Walendin


LEP-O'N


MART-PO


M-PE


LIU-NOVI
Janet Sozio


O'R-STA


PU-STR


PI-SN
NOVO-SP
Kristi Stone


STE-Z


STUN-Z


SO-Z
ST-Z



What to do if…

The whole group is unresponsive -
- Ask students to work in pairs or trios first to get people talking and energized.
- Use open questions and leave plenty of time for them to
answer.
- Ask students to write down their answers first and share
with a neighbor.

Individuals are silent or unresponsive –
- Use open, exploratory questions.
- Invite individuals in: “I’d like to hear what Lauren thinks about this”
- Pair up the quieter individuals with those more willing to share.

Discussion goes off topic and becomes irrelevant –
- Let the group know the topic in advance.
- Say: “I’m wondering how this relates to today’s topic.”
- Seek agreement on what should be discussed.

Members do not listen to each other –
- Point out what is happening.
- Establish ground rules about behavior.
- Discuss the fact that everyone’s opinions and ideas are valid.
- If everyone is talking at once, use an object to pass around the group and each person talks only when they have the object in their hand.

One or two students are very dominant –
- Use verbal cues such as: “Let’s make sure everyone has a chance to share and participate.”
- See if you are giving them too much “non-verbal” encouragement, such as eye contact and positive comments.